Trucking Company in 14-car Pileup Had History of Driving Violations

Archives, Trucking Accidents

Asking for donation money instead of presents, Rachel Beckworth had just turned 9 years old. For her birthday she asked for money instead of presents. She had raised nearly $300 for a charity that provides clean drinking water to undeveloped countries when she was killed in a Seattle big rig truck accident.

AP Transport, which owns the truck that caused the 14-car pileup that killed Rachel and sent 6 other people to the hospital, was the stimuli for a discussion within Washington about truck safety issues.

With shockingly poor safety scores, AP Transport has a record of not pulling vehicles off the road when they had safety issues. Instead, the company put profits over people and continued to run their trucks on the highways of Washington.

According to the United States Department of Transportation, safety records at AP Transport show that more than 24 AP Transport big rigs have been pulled from the road during surprise safety inspections. It also indicates not only a history of poor performance, but of having a record of defective vehicles that reached nearly 50 percent.

News reports say that investigators are reluctant to talk about the crash so early in the investigation. But it is known that the semi-truck owned by AP Transport set off a chain reaction in which the big rig accident resulted in the death of Rachel and in injuries to six people.

A logging truck driver, who was the first one hit in the big rig accident, criticized the driver of the big rig for driving far too fast for the road conditions, causing the driver of the AP Transport big rig to lose control. The big rig ripped off its back axel in the accident.
For more details about the Seattle big rig accident, read the full KOMO news story here.

Since Rachel’s death, people have contributed almost $100,000 to the clean water project Rachel supported.