Patient Dies from Overdose at Rowland Care Center

Colton, Calif.— Ernest Rowland was admitted to Arrowhead Regional Medical Center Foundation to receive treatment for his ongoing medical conditions, which included paranoid schizophrenia. The facility had treated Rowland on multiple occasions and knew he was a high risk for having an adverse reaction to drugs, and required significant interventions to protect him from injury. However, they neglected this fact and administered what ended up being a fatal cocktail of medications.

“The facility was well aware that the safety and security they promised to provide Ernest was non-existent,” said Attorney Stephen Garcia. “Instead of providing proper care, the facility subjected Ernest to dangerous propensities, which eventually resulted in his death.”

Garcia & Artigliere filed a lawsuit against Arrowhead Regional Medical Center Foundation for elder abuse, negligence, negligent hiring and supervision, and wrongful death. The lawsuit alleges that Rowland suffered from a history of schizophrenia where he would periodically undergo episodes of acute paranoia.

On December 3, 2015, Rowland was taken to the hospital due to an episode of paranoia. Usually, when these episodes occurred, he was treated and released on the same day. However, no one from Rowland’s family heard from him after his admittance.

Instead, the facility administered a cocktail of dangerous and psychotropic medications to Rowland that caused him to lose consciousness, which he would never regain. Staff failed to monitor his conditions in response to the unapproved medications they were administering, and were unable to revive his state of lucidness. The facility allowed Rowland to lay limp in his bed for the remainder of his stay at the facility — and his life for that matter.

In an attempt to conceal Rowland’s condition, staff lied when his family called to speak with him, stating that he was ‘sleeping’. The next day, a doctor from the facility called Rowland’s family and informed them that he had passed away. After reviewing the medical records, Rowland’s family found out that he had been given high doses of multiple medications and other drugs simultaneously, and instead of taking immediate action, the facility and staff left him unresponsive before admitting him to the emergency room.

“The ultimate injury and death he suffered would not have occurred had the facility simply adhered to applicable rules, laws and regulations,” added Garcia.

Rowland passed away on December 4, 2015, due to the insufficient training and negligence he received at the facility.