Lawsuit Filed: Elderly Woman Develops Sepsis at Pacifica Nursing Facility

Sun Valley, Calif. – After falling victim to a serious car accident, Kimberly Carroll became paralyzed from the waist down. She was admitted to Pacifica Hospital of the Valley for recovery from her injuries; however, it’s alleged that the facility accepted responsibility for her care knowingly that they did not have enough staff to provide the care she required. As a result of their negligence, Carroll developed a Stage IV pressure sore, sepsis, UTI and aspiration pneumonia.

Garcia & Artigliere & Faulkner filed a lawsuit against Pacifica Hospital of the Valley for elder abuse, and negligent hiring and supervision.

“Pacifica Hospital of the Valley certainly knew, or in the exercise of reasonable diligence should have known, that they did not have the resources or trained staff available to fulfill their promises to properly care for Kimberly,” said Attorney Stephen Garcia. “Due to her condition, Kimberly required full assistance with all of her activities of daily living. The ‘heads in the beds’ mentality to unlawfully churn money is a situation which is so typical and horribly results in significant injuries to elders of this state such as Kimberly.”

Allegations and Background

In July 2015, Carroll was involved in a car accident which left her paralyzed from the waist down. In September 2015, she was admitted to Pacifica Hospital of the Valley for recovery from her injuries.

Upon her admission, the facility knew that because Carroll was a paraplegic, she was at an extremely high risk to suffer skin breakdown. The lawsuit alleges that over the course of her stay, the facility ignored her known needs and withheld required care, including failing to provide assistance with activities of daily living, failing to provide constant attention and care to her skin, and failing to make she was clean and dry from feces.

According to the lawsuit, on October 28, 2016, Carroll was discharged from the facility and released to her sister’s home. However, because Carroll was constantly ignored throughout her residency, and was not given proper medical attention, she fell extremely ill and ended up in the hospital two days later.

The lawsuit states that Carroll was transferred to Sutter Roseville Hospital where she was admitted and diagnosed with a UTI, blood in her foley catheter, sepsis, a stage IV pressure sore on her tailbone and aspiration pneumonia; her lungs were full of blood. The lawsuit alleges that all of these ailments were unlawfully concealed from Carroll, her family and physician.

As a result of the facility’s negligence, and due to the extent of her injuries, Carroll spent another month in the hospital recovering before she was discharged.