Angelic Manor Patient Suffers Multiple Pressure Sores Due to Negligence

Garcia & Artigliere filed a lawsuit against Angelic Manor for elder abuse, negligence, and negligent hiring and supervision. Due to the rampant understaffing, lack of training, unfitness of staff and failure to allot sufficient economic resources, Carol Pregill suffered severe pressure sores, a broken finger, a bruised face, overmedication, starvation and substantial weight loss.

“The facility and staff neglected Ms. Pregill and disregarded the known risks she possessed,” said Attorney Stephen Garcia. “They accepted responsibility for her as a resident when they knew full well they were incapable of providing her with the care she required.”

On April 30, 2014, Ms. Pregill began residing at Angelic Manor because her family could no longer care for her at home. Prior to admission, Ms. Pregill suffered a fall that resulted in a broken femur and hip, causing her to walk with a limp and requiring her to use a walker. Additionally, she was at high risk for both skin breakdown and the development of pressure sores.

Staff members neglected to care properly for Ms. Pregill by leaving her in a urine- and feces-soaked bed for extended periods of time, failing to provide proper personal hygiene, ignoring the need to reposition her every two hours, and failing to provide adequate nutrition and hydration. Furthermore, the staff failed to adhere to her physicians’ orders to communicate accurately Ms. Pregill’s medical conditions.

Three weeks after her admission to the facility, Ms. Pregill broke her pinky finger. The staff claimed they did not know how the injury occurred and failed to assess the injury properly and to notify Ms. Pregill’s physician and family. Later, Ms. Pregill’s care needs increased. Due to her myriad of medical conditions, she would often lash out at caregivers; however, rather than adjust her care plan, caregivers overmedicated her to such an extent that she was listless and unable to feed herself. One morning during breakfast, she was left unattended and so overmedicated that her head fell and hit the table, resulting in a bloody lip and facial bruising.

Ms. Pregill lost 30 to 40 pounds in four months. In a fraudulent effort to conceal their misconduct, the facility refused to inform Ms. Pregill’s physician of her unusual weight loss. In September, the facility tried to shift responsibility to another entity because they realized they were incapable of providing the proper level of care for Ms. Pregill.

As a result, an administrator instructed Ms. Pregill’s daughter that her mother was a “candidate for hospice.” Ms. Pregill was transferred to Elizabeth Hospice, where she was assessed with multiple bedsores on her hips, buttocks, heel and ear, as well as a stage IV pressure sore.